Fashion brands to support this NAIDOC Week (and always). - Ethical Made Easy
Fashion brands to support this NAIDOC Week (and always).

Fashion brands to support this NAIDOC Week (and always).

Written by Lola Asaadi. Main image by MAARA Collective

Fashion brands to support this NAIDOC Week (and always).

We acknowledge Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as the First Australians and Traditional Custodians of the lands where we live, learn and work.

NAIDOC (National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee) Week is about celebrating the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. NAIDOC Week focuses on supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, and although this is not something that is (or should be) exclusive to just one week, NAIDOC Week is a brilliant opportunity to do so. 

NAIDOC is now the name for an entire week of celebrating the history and achievements of these rich cultures, however NAIDOC Week wasn’t always NAIDOC Week. Originally NADOC (National Aborigines Day Observance Committee), NADOC became NAIDOC in recognition of the distinct cultural histories of both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and has grown from a day of remembrance to a week of celebration, recognition, and support.

This year’s NAIDOC theme, Heal Country, is about appreciating, empowering, and protecting the cultures and heritage of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. With this, we’ve put together a list of fashion brands and designers for you to support this NAIDOC Week, as well as a few resources you can use to further your own understanding and support.

* Please note that not all of these companies/brands are Indigenous owned, though all have the overarching goal of celebrating Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and cultures.


Clothing The Gaps

An Aboriginal owned and led fashion label producing garments that celebrate Aboriginal people and culture, and that “encourages people to wear their values on their tee.”

Clothing The Gaps

Clothing The Gaps

Clair Helen

A proud First Nations Australian fashion label led by Clair Helen, a graphic designer, artist and fashion designer, and a proud takaringa woman from the Tiwi Islands.

Clair Helen
Clair Helen

Ginny’s Girl Gang

A label intertwining culture, art and fashion led by artist and advocate Regina Jones (aka Ginny), a proud Gomaroi/ Gamilaraay woman from Brisbane.

Ginny’s Girl Gang
Ginny’s Girl Gang

Yarn

A marketplace  that aims to celebrate First Nations art and culture through a large variety of Indigenous designed fashion, accessories and homewares.

Yarn
Yarn

Amber Days

An Aboriginal-owned ethical children’s fashion label led by Corina Muir; an Aboriginal mother, nature protector, artist, designer and campaigner.

Amber Days
Amber Days

AARLI

A First Nations brand led by TJ Cowlishaw, AARLI (meaning fish in Bardi language) creates custom-made clothing with upcycled remnant textiles and products, contemporary prints, and deadstock fabrics.

AARLI
AARLI

Ngali

A sustainable fashion label focusing led by Denni Francisco, a Wiradjuri woman, and focusing on Yindayamarra, “fashion that shows respect, is polite, considered, gentle to Country and shows honour to the cross country collaborations with other Aborignal and Torres Strait Islander creatives.”

Ngali
Ngali

Ngarru Miimi

An ethical and slow fashion label led by Lillardia Briggs-Houston, a Wiradjuri Gangulu Yorta Yorta woman based in Narrungdera/Narrandera, Wiradjuri Country.

Ngarru Miimi
Ngarru Miimi

MAARA Collective

Referring to ‘hands’ in the Yuwaalaraay and Gamilaraay language groups, MAARA is an Australian luxury resort-wear brand working closely with Indigenous artists and creatives. 

MAARA Collective
MAARA Collective

Native Swimwear

A fairtrade, sustainable, multi-award winning Australian Aborginal fashion label ensuring any original artworks used benefit the artist and their communities.

Native Swimwear

Deadly Denim

An upcycled Indigenous fashion label showcasing First Nations art, and founded by Rebecca Rickard, a Ballardong, Whadjuk woman from the Nyungar nation

Deadly Denim
Deadly Denim

Gammin Threads

An Australian fashion label for “people who believe in living colourfully, paying respect and empowering women”, founded by Tahnee, a proud descendant of the Yorta Yorta, Taungurung, Boonwurrung & Mutti Mutti nations.

Gammin Threads
Gammin Threads

Bábbarra Women’s Centre

Led by the Bábbarra Women’s Board, Bábbarra Women’s Centre helps local women gain sustainable livelihoods through women-centred enterprises.

Bábbarra Women’s Centre
Bábbarra Women’s Centre

Haus Of Dizzy

Founded by proud Wiradjuri woman Kristy Dickinson, Haus of Dizzy celebrates Indigenous culture through playful and statement-making jewellery and accessories.

Haus Of Dizzy
Haus Of Dizzy

Kirrikin

An Indigenous-registered business that showcases artwork by Indigenous Australian artists through luxury fashion and accessories.

Kirrikin
Kirrikin

Kamara

An ethical Australian swimwear label using bold prints, unique designs and protective fabrics, by Indigenous sisters Kirsty and Naomi.

Kamara
Kamara

Australian Indigenous Fashion

Curated Instagram account showcasing Australia’s thriving Indigenous fashion community.

Australian Indigenous Fashion
Australian Indigenous Fashion

Grace Lillian Lee

A multicultural Australian designer, mentor, curator and artist that draws inspiration from her Indigenous roots. 

Grace Lillian Lee
Grace Lillian Lee

Liandra Swim

A designer swimwear label founded by Liandra Gaykamangu, a Yolngu woman from North-East Arnhem Land, with signature prints inspired by Aboriginal culture. 

Liandra Swim
Liandra Swim

North

“A non-for-profit governed by Indigenous and non-Indigenous members” that works with skilful Indigenous artists to create high-quality clothing, accessories, interiors and upholstery.

North
North

Bush Magic Metal

An Australian jewellery brand “inspired by culture, the stories, our ancestors being custodians of the land, and my love for the Australian Bush” by Lydia Baker, a proud Indigenous woman from Bundjalung Country.

Bush Magic Metal
Bush Magic Metal

Magpie Goose

An Aboriginal owned and led social enterprise celebrating Aboriginal people, culture and stories through fashion, accessories and stories.

Magpie Goose
Magpie Goose


Although NAIDOC Week is an incredible opportunity to support companies led by or celebrating the cultures of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Isalnder peoples, this should not be exclusive to just one week. Ongoing support of and appreciation for not only Indigenous-led and owned businesses but also of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures as a whole is something all Australians should be striving for, and is vital in our collective efforts to Heal Country.


To learn more about NAIDOC Week and to listen to Indigenous voices, the NAIDOC website, WhyNot, ABC Indigenous, Australian Story’s episode Yalari Success Story: Paying It Forward, Nakkiah Lui and Miranda Tapsell’s podcast Pretty For An Aboriginal, and Stan Grant’s book Talking To My Country have been great resources for us, and we hope they will be for you, too.


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