Meet Amy Pierce, the interior designer who turned her passion for colour into Paint Nail Lacquer.

Meet Amy Pierce, the interior designer who turned her passion for colour into Paint Nail Lacquer.

Nail polish is not the first thing that comes to mind when you think of ethically made and sustainably sourced products, but it was for Amy Pierce. As an interior designer, Amy uses a lot of creative energy in her 9-5, and it was in her love of colour and personal style where a different creative outlet was born. 

What made you start Paint?
Paint was born because of my love of colour.

I am an interior designer and when I was working on projects and using the paint fan decks I would often find myself wishing I could have this specific shade in a nail polish. From there I combined my interests of colour, design and beauty.

Paint is a creative platform for me to express myself. It brings me so much joy and satisfaction to continually grow and evolve my brand.

I love being able to create a design aesthetic tailed to my personal style and sharing this with my customers and collaborating with other creatives.


What has been the most challenging thing you have uncovered since the beginning?
Thinking of ways to stay unique but approachable in a market that is saturated with great products.


Within the ethical fashion community, there’s a big question that we ask which is ‘who made my clothes?’. In the scope of Paint, who made your Nail Polish? Can you tell us a bit about them?
Paint is made in Australia by an Australian owned manufacturer. I have a close relationship with my manufacturer who spends a lot of time helping me to bring my colour visions to life. They are innovative and driven by reducing any impacts of their products, and they’ve even perfected an oxygen and water permeable formula.

They are also dedicated to improving the ingredients we use and trying to find new ways to make the product more sustainable and better for our customers!

Why did you pick the fabrics or materials that you have chosen to work with?
As an interior designer I spend a lot of time working with colour and colour forecasts. Through interior design I am able to gain an additional perspective outside of the beauty and fashion world.

The Paint range is small and considered, consisting of classics and carefully selected on trend colours.

Best piece of advice you have ever received?
To trust that if you believe you can do something, you can, and it’s achievable.


Why was it important to you to make your brand ethical?
There is a growing awareness in society for ethical choices and standards and I needed Paint to comply if I was going to release a product that I am proud of. This is also the reason that it had to be cruelty free, 10-free and made in Australia.

The core principles I had in mind when starting Paint were high ethical values and standards, a quality product and, of course, design and colour.


What is something others wouldn’t know about starting an ethical business that you think they should?
When you prioritise ethics, you may have to compromise financially. However if you’re passionate about doing things right, you are able to focus on the bigger picture for your brand.


One tip you’d give to others who are wanting to start their own business?
Action. Don’t overthink an idea for too long, just start with action and the rest will follow. I find it very helpful to speak with likeminded people with similar projects to gain additional advice. Social media is such an amazing tool for this.

Don’t be held back by the fear of making mistakes as these are the most valuable learning tools and often a catalyst to move forward.  


Where do you envision Paint in the future?
This next year I plan to collaborate with a new creative each season. I plan on approaching people from many areas of design ranging from beauty stylists to fashion blogger designers, furniture designers, interior designers, artists and even the food/ hospitality industry.

I think this broad range of expertise will bring something really unique to my brand.

I’m really excited to have Paint stocked at the National Gallery of Australia in Canberra and to be part of their current design exhibition.

We have also started researching a recycling program for our bottles!


What or who inspires you to do what you do on a daily basis?
Working in a creative environment is a great source of inspiration. I look to other interior designers and architects. I love local designers such as Tamsin Johnson and artists such as Den Holm and Bobby Clark.


Do you have a morning routine? If so, what is it you do to set yourself up for the day ahead?
As I still work full time as an Interior Designer, I like to make a strict schedule for Paint to ensure that my brand is progressing and expanding while keeping up with the demands of running the physical side of the business (processing orders, admin, accounting, etc).

I now have Ali working with me to help out. She’s great, keeps me inspired and on track and also has an amazing design aesthetic.

At the beginning of the week we schedule social media posts and ensure we have enough content to keep our audience engaged. We try to meet weekly to make a list of everything we want to achieve for that week.

One book everyone should read? Why?
The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck. It’s light but really informative. Essentially the message is that we need strategies to cope with the inevitable peaks and troughs of life, to reassess our values as there are only so many things we can care about and need to fine-tune the ones that really matter.   


One documentary everyone should watch? Why?
Innsaei (currently on Netflix). This is about renowned thinkers and spiritualists who discuss the Icelandic concept of innsaei, which enables humans to connect through empathy and intuition. It explores how in our modern world we spend so much time outwardly reaching and how important it is to look inward, stay grounded and be in tune with our inner knowing and intuition.


Are there any other Movers & Shakers out there in your world that you think people should know about?
Mari Andrew. She is a writer, illustrator and speaker based in NYC.

From Ali – there are so many amazing sustainable, ethical and positive female Movers & Shakers out there at the moment!

Lauren Singer from Trash is for Tossers, Amanda and Charlotte from Bob in Melbourne, Cat from Good Times Pilates in Fitzroy and Nicole from Tribe Natural Beauty in Bronte.

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